Yin is slow, making it accessible for all

Yin is slow. I usually like to spend about 5-7 min in each pose. This gives ample time for them to soak into the target areas, and it gives me plenty of time to check on the students.

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I am blessed with a repertoire of props available @belive_practice, they are used extensively by the students for comfort and also to better access the target areas. To quote Jivana, founder of Accessible Yoga, “[when we shift] our understanding of yoga away from the perfect images we see in magazines and social media, we expand our perceptions of yoga and how it can serve the diversity of humankind.”

Here, we adapt the posture to the person, instead of the person to the pose. And thus, one pose, many forms and shapes. It is so heartening to watch how one who might be resistance to the use of props initially, begin to reach out for them so skillfully after few lessons.

As a Yin teacher, I hold space for magic to happen. Trusting the process; the breath soften, the heart opens, the mind sees.

Author: Blue Hanuman

A Physicist | A Yogi | An educator | An Oiler | A wellness Enthusiast

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